Archive | News

RSS feed for this section

stik Reviews about Hayk Oltaci

Haki is an excellent and knowledgeable source for fine rugs.
I would use him again in a minute”

You couldn’t possibly ask for better work and a friendlier person. Sorry that the recommendation stops with 5 stars. I’d rather give 10.”

Hayak is a great businessman, friendly, extremely knowledgeable about textiles, and is will to give clients the best price he can. I have enjoyed all of my interactions with Hayak!”

He is an artist,extremely knowledgeable and respectable on his exceptional work.”

I met Hayko about 6 years ago, I took a course that he presents in learning the art of rug weaving. I don’t know of anywhere or anyone that puts on a course quite like Hayko does. He is a true Master of his craft. I own the Old World Rug Washing Company here on Long Island, and when one of my customers need any type of repairs or appraisals I go to Hayko. He does amazing work. When I pick up a peice that Hayko has repaired you can not tell where the repair was. A true Master!!~ Bert PresantSee More

I am an interior designer and have used Hayko´s services many times. Hayko is the consummate antique rug expert. It takes him only a quick look to tell you any rug´s origin, age, value and condition. When he see´s a gem, you see his face light up.
His expertise also is with restoration. Amazing, in a word. I have seen large holes in rugs that are restored to original state with no sign of the previous wear. This makes what Hayko does valuable because it extends the life of the rug for future generations and increases it´s value. The ultimate in green living!
With such a good eye, he has amassed a collection of fine investment pieces that are also for sale.See More

You have to look beneath the quiet demeanor to recognize how passionately Hayko feels about what he does and the culture from which he comes. He recognizes rugs as part of an older more congenial time when people would gather together on rugs and in the process of selecting rugs. When the rug, the dealer and the repairman worked to build with you, a lifelong relationship.

I strongly recommend that you let Hayko share his world with you!See More

Hayko is one of the world’s noted authorities in his field. He is a bit of Europe, of the Old World, of Constantinople right in New York City. We are lucky to have him. He is also an honest, kind, generous man who is a pleasure to know .
I lived on the floor above his store on Lexington Avenue and 65th Street for several years. I saw him on the stairs or in his shop almost every day. We talked about everything. I know his family. He is one of the people I most trust and admire.See More

Hayk is extraordinary at restoration of antique hand -made rugs. He has worked with me for several years and the caliber of his work is consistently of superior quality. Complete satisfaction from all clients of mine that have had Hayk work on their rugs. Would definitely recommend him with complete confidence.

Diane Martine
CEO Sutton Carpet LTD”

Yelp Recommended Reviews

Your trust is our top concern, so businesses can’t pay to alter or remove their reviews. Learn more.
  • Larry S.
    • Larry S.
    • New York, NY

    10/6/2013

    The rug we bought from Hayko has been in our living room for 20+ years. It has survived our friends, our families, our boys, their friends, now their families… just like Hayk said it would.  Nothing we bought and have constantly used for 20+ years has held up and looks as good as the rug Hayk personally chose for us. If you are in the market for an Oriental Rug, skip the department stores and carpet retailers and visit Hayko.

     

  • Kezi H.
    • Kezi H.
    • New York, NY

    8/25/2009

    First to Review

    Hayko is an expert and I highly recommend. I have attended several cultural events taking place in the galery. I enjoyed intro to rug making. He’s very knowledgeable and enthusiastic. If you are in the area, make sure to drop by and see for yourself. You can buy from him with confidence. I get my rugs cleaned by him, I wouldn’t have anyone else handle them!

  • Sandra W.
    • Sandra W.
    • New York, NY

    9/23/2013

    We’re more than thankful for finding out about Hayko. Not only did he do a fantastic job on our antique, large area rug and a small wall hanging, he cleaned and repaired them in a timely manner. He’s courteous, friendly, and extremely professional. He also has an encyclopedic knowledge of rugs….

  • Armen K.
    • Armen K.
    • Jackson Heights, NY

    10/27/2009

    Hayko a true master of rug restoration, the best west of Istanbul! Visit his great shop for a journey back to Anatolia, and a cup of great coffee……

Reviews from Google users

  Oct 3, 2013
Reviews from Google users

The rug we bought from Hayko has been in our living room for 20+ years. It has survived our friends, our families, our boys, their friends, now their families… just like he said it would. Nothing we bought and have constantly used for 20+ years has held up and looks as good as the rug Hayk personally chose for us. If you are in the market for an Oriental Rug, skip the department stores and carpet retailers and visit Hayko.

1010 WINS

Our commercials on 1010 WINS

Dear valued Clients and Friends,

The 1010 WINS radio has begun broadcasting our commercial since last Sunday, July 14. The message encapsulates the essence of our business.
To listen to it now, please click here.

We are committed to providing each client with the same exacting service as we have provided to several museums, an auction house, and many collectors. Undoubtedly, precious hand-woven rugs must receive the utmost in expert cleaning and repair to maintain their beauty and integrity for generations.

Also, it is well worth to emphasize that we have significantly increased our collection of fine antique and semi-antique rugs through recent acquisitions from overseas. We are now compelled to share our excitement of owning this exquisite collection with our valued clientele.

If we can be of assistance to you, please do not hesitate to contact us, either by e-mail: info@hayko.com, or by phone at 212.717.5400.

We will be delighted to hear from you. Building long-term business relationships with our clients is the most important aspect of our mission.

Thank you for your time and consideration.Sincerely,
Hayko

Back to Our 1010 WINS Commercials Log (Rug Evaluation)

Our message

HaykoFBbannerBanner

Recently, we have had two significant developments. To expand our business, we have moved from Lexington Avenue to Long Island City. In addition to our over half-a-century of combined expertise in repairing antique and semi-antique Oriental rugs and European tapestries, we now have increased our capacity of hand-washing and repairing them at our new location.

Undoubtedly, your precious hand-woven rugs must receive the utmost in expert cleaning and repair services to maintain their beauty and integrity for generations. We are committed to providing you with the same meticulous service as we have provided to several museums, an auction house, and many collectors. Building long-term business relationships with our clients is the most important aspect of our mission.

As for our second important update, we have significantly increased our collection of fine antique and semi-antique rugs through our recent acquisitions from overseas. We are now compelled to share our excitement of owning this exquisite collection with our valued clientele.

Please do not hesitate to contact us, either by e-mail: info@hayko.com, or by calling 212.717.5400, if we can be of assistance to you.

We will be delighted to hear from you if we can be of help.

Franklin Report Card

Franklin Report Report Card for Hayko Fine Rugs and Tapestries in New York City

Hayko Fine Rugs and Tapestries

9-20 35th Avenue, Space 3D
Long Island City, NY 11106
(212) 717-5400
www.hayko.com
info@hayko.com
Main Contact: Hayko Oltaci
Categories
Carpets & Rugs – Showrooms
Carpets & Rugs – Cleaning & Repair
Art & Antiques Appraisers

Services & Specialties
Museum-quality antique carpet, tapestry and needlepoint cleaning, retail and restoration

FRANKLIN REPORT RATINGS
Recommendation:
Work Quality:
Cost Evaluation:
Value Analysis :
+ add your review Key to Ratings
Share on Facebook RECOMMEND E-mail E-MAIL
Share on Twitter TWITTER Linked-In LINKEDIN
FR Review:
“Hayko’s work cannot be seen. That’s the point, quality restoration is invisible,” proclaims Hayk Oltaci of Hayko Restoration and Conservation. Oltaci’s loyal clientele tell us he’s a man who understands that rugs are not only decorative and functional pieces, but historic artifacts as well.Oltaci’s interest in rugs began at the age of 16 in Istanbul when his grandfather gave him an old Turkish rug in need of repair. Oltaci worked in France prior to founding his New York firm in 1992. The company boasts a top-notch atelier in Long Island City where staffers custom mix the dyes that make their needlework invisible. Impeccable credentials and an industrious nature makes Oltaci a favorite of top designers, upscale private collectors, homeowners, museums, dealers and auction houses.High-end clients from around the globe can’t say enough about Hayko’s delicate and painstaking work, which can take over a year on a complicated restoration. Christie’s regularly refers its clients to this firm to care for antique rugs. Reportedly Oltaci is a “pleasure to work with” and a “true artisan”. Prices may be higher than some, but clients say this “amazing craftsman” is worth every penny.
Representative Client Comments:
“The most honest man I know.” “There’s nobody else as good as Hayko.” “A wonderful craftsman. I’ve been using him for at least ten years now.” “He goes out of his way for his clients. He came to my aid in an emergency–came to my home in the evening and repaired my rug right there.” “Major museums know his work is nothing short of perfect.” “Produces results in a timely manner.” “Two rugs bled to the point of being ruined. Hayko admitted that his guys should have checked for bleeding before cleaning, and ultimately gave us a [replacement] rug.”
5 stars (0)
4 stars (0)
3 stars (0)
2 stars (0)
1 star (0)
REGISTERED (1 review )
Posted 3/19/2010
Reviewed By:
kck2 New York, NY

Recommendation:
Work Quality:
Cost Evaluation:
Value Analysis :
+ add your review

Project Description & Comments:
We had three rugs to be cleaned. Two bled to the point of ruining the rugs. Hayko admitted that his guys should have checked for bleeding before cleaning. Too late for us. He then offered to sell us a rug to replace at a discount, and ultimately gave us a rug. We didn’t ask for it and it is not of the same quality as the ruined rugs.
Cost of Project: $301 – 1,000

Was this review: Helpful (345)    Interesting (373)    Flag as inappropriate
 
Keywords

An Interview with Hayko

An Interview with Hayko    11/27/2009

Tai Aguirre
TAICO® PRODUCTIONS

Q: What was your occupation and lifestyle in your native country Turkey?

A: I was a student, hoping to study economics. But restoring antique rugs was an interest for me from an early age. My grandfather gave me a beautiful Turkish rug. I was a teenager, 17 years old. It was a Turkish rug from Konya Ladik region, a prayer rug. There was a hole and selvage was missing, and the border on the side was missing. We knew a repair man and we sent it to him. Three months later, we got it back. My heart was broken, it was horrible what he did to it.

He put patches on the holes and cut the original selvage off. It looked like a cheap machine-made rug. This rug had been a beautiful work of art, like a great painting. Now it was ruined by bad repair.

I knew at that moment I wanted to help save these great works of art from my country in the future.

Q: Did you come to NYC alone or were you accompanied by someone? Who joins you living here in NYC?

A: I came to the United   States 20 years ago with my wife, two suitcases, and $200. Now we have two beautiful intelligent girls, 18 and 14.

Q: What led up to your leaving your native country to come to NYC?

A: I was 19 years old, I asked my father if I could live in Strasbourg in France, to study economics and learn to speak French. He said yes. After living 10 years in France I came to New York in 1988.

Q: How do you size up your experience so far living in a city such as NYC?

A: What I did in New York I wasn’t able to accomplish in France or my native country Turkey. Because of Americans, Americans are the most wonderful people in the world. America is truly the land of opportunity.

Q: Please share a scary, unusual, funny or challenging story that illustrates your experience coming here and living here.

A: Most people have a story like that. In my case when I came to America, I was going to live in California . In the first week I found a job here in New York; I never went to California.

For the first five years I worked for my boss Berg Andonian, a very well-known antique Caucasian Rug dealer. Five years later I opened my store in the Chelsea  Antique Building and for the first time I started to serve the public. Then I moved to my current location, at Lexington   Avenue and 65th Street.

Q: Talk a little bit about your products and services.

A: Some of the finest rugs in the world are in my shop. I help people understand their value and how to care for them. I also advise them on how to choose the rug that will be exactly right for them. We work closely with clients, both people who own museum-quality pieces and people who are considering acquiring a rug or tapestry for the first time.

And of course we do restoration for major museums and serious collectors. You never know what you will find here. I had a Mogul Pashmina rug sold for $6,000, and six months later I saw in the Sotheby’s auction catalog an estimate of $250,000-$350,000. It sold privately after the auction for $140,000.. This shows you that absolutely amazing bargains sometimes happen.

Q: Why should someone buy antique oriental rugs?

A: Let me tell you, the reason to have rugs like this is because they are fabulous works of art, one of a kind. They transform a room into something special and unique. If you buy a machine made rug, in a few years it’s worth less money than you paid for it.

If you buy a genuine antique tribal or oriental rug, not only will it look beautiful in your home and be a joy to look at every passing year, but I know of cases where a person bought a rug for relatively little money and the rug in short time increased in value. But I think you shouldn’t buy an antique rug because it will increase in value, but rather because you love it.

Your home is an extension of yourself. The things you choose to have in you home say a lot about you. When I see a room with real antique oriental rugs or tapestries, I know the person who lives here has a certain level of education, of sophistication in the best sense of the word — that is, this person is familiar with things of great beauty and value in the world.

The good thing about antique rugs is that they go beautifully with every style of furniture. You can have very modern or highly traditional furniture and it will be made better by an antique oriental rug or tapestry.

 

Tai  Aguirre

 

If you have any questions, which have not been addressed, please visit out Contact page

When Carpet Repair Makes Sense

When Carpet Repair Makes Sense    11/12/2009

by Regine Cole,
as seen in Old House Interiors

An editor’s visit to the Lexington Avenue workroom of Hayko Oltaci reveals why good (that is, invisible) carpet repair is expensive. It requires design and color sense and practical skill.

What do you do when the puppy chews the corner of that antique prayer rug you love? When the hooked rug your grandmother bought in rural Maine many years ago begins to disintegrate, can it be repaired? Should it be? Let’s say you’re a collector, and you’ve got your eye on a wonderful Aubusson that’s worn threadbare in the center. Should you buy it with restoration in mind, knowing how difficult it is to match the colors? You already know that a clumsy repaired old tapestry is worth less than one with holes.

 

An editor’s visit to the Lexington Avenue workroom of Hayko Oltaci reveals why good (that is, invisible) carpet repair is expensive. It requires design and color sense and practical skill.

What do you do when the puppy chews the corner of that antique prayer rug you love? When the hooked rug your grandmother bought in rural Maine many years ago begins to disintegrate, can it be repaired? Should it be? Let’s say you’re a collector, and you’ve got your eye on a wonderful Aubusson that’s worn threadbare in the center. Should you buy it with restoration in mind, knowing how difficult it is to match the colors? You already know that a clumsy repaired old tapestry is worth less than one with holes.

Carpet lovers bring dilemmas like these to a narrow, unassuming door amidst the hustle and bustle of New York’s Lexington Avenue in the Sixties. Stairs lead to the second-storey atelier of Hayko Oltaci. New carpets (which he sells) are rolled up in one corner. Old carpets (which he loves) are everywhere else: stacked on the floor, draped over tables, hung on the walls, and stretched like a canopy over his desk. The carpet restorer visitors that his work, on display at prominent auction houses and galleries, is invisible. “Good carpet repair can’t be seen,” he says. It may seem that he’s stating the obvious. But a few hours of looking and listening taught this visitor that the work of repairing carpets, more painstaking than incomprehensible, is hard to do so that it doesn’t show. And you realize Hayko, a Turkish-Armenian-American born in Istanbul, has something more than knowledge, skill and experience, although he certainly has those. He has an instinctive understanding of the original weaver’s intention. His is a near mystical affinity for carpets.

A large Oushak is folded and draped before a woman seated at a large table in the back half of Hayko’s long, narrow shop. The no. 20 tapestry needle in her hand flashes as she works on the damaged area spread out in front of her. She takes tiny stitches, ties knots and trims the woolen yarn with fluid, sure movements while she talks with her workmates, who are similarly working on carpets spread out in front of them. Hung on the wall behind her are the skeins of wool in colors corresponding to the ones in the carpet. All those different colors, and the scale of the individual knots compared to the size of the whole carpet, are a visual lesson in the complexity of the pattern, the huge range of colors, the subtlety of their blending – in short the enormity of the job. She’ll be at this a long time, I suppose.

“A rectangular piece in a Caucasian rug, approximately 8 inches by 3 inches”, Hayko agrees, “will take one week.”

Most of the skeins hung behind the workers are the crewel, Persian, and tapestry yarns known to needlepoint hobbyists: Anchor, Appleton, and Paternayan brand wools in one-, two-, and three-ply strands.

“We also use hand-spun woolen yarn”, Hayko says. “Whatever is closest to what was originally used. If we can’t make a close enough color match, then we have to dye the yarn ourselves. If there’s a hole, you you have to put back the warp and the weft.”

These are, in the case of oriental rugs, usually made of cotton, wool, or a combination of the two. Several of the projects spread out on his worktable show rectangular areas with the contrasting brightness of the new threads being woven into old carpets. But no two jobs are exactly the same. To do this work well, you have to know fibers, be able to tie Ghiordes, Jufti, or Senneh knots needlepoint in tent, cross, half-cross, or basketweave stitches, do plain weave and weft wrapping, overcasting, chain stitching, and be able to differentiate between vegetal and aniline dyes, right- or left-hand lays. In short, repairing rugs requires what is needed to make them in the first place: sure, practiced hands, a good sense of design and color, appreciation for the materials. Since Hayko does not limit his work to oriental rugs, but also repairs tapestries, kilims, needlepointed rugs, hooked and rag rugs, encyclopedic knowledge of the huge world of carpets is only a beginning. With becoming modesty, he claims that after 20 years in carpet repair, he is still just learning.

Hayko was not born into this business. His passion was sparked when, as a teenager, he was disappointed at a rug his father as sent out for repair. “They didn’t ruin it”, he says. “But they did shoddy work, and the carpet deserved better”. Upon leaving school, Hayko served a two-year apprenticeship at a famous Istanbul carpet repair shop, then moved to France to ply his chosen trade. Here too, he was disappointed by the quality level of the workmanship he encountered. And he felt unappreciated.

“In France, you work, you work, you don’t make any money,” he recalls. “It was seven years of agony.”

He left for California and employment at a large firm , and eventually ca to New York, where he started his business in the Chelsea Antique Building. At first he worked for the surrounding carpet dealers. Three years ago he moved to this location, and now his clients includes Christie’s, Bloomingdale’s, high-level collectors, and homeowners from the nearby Upper East Side. His hands spend less time holding a needle as more of his time goes into the mechanics of running a business. But he trains each of his employees in the methods he first learned in Turkey.

“It takes three to six months to be able to do it,” Hayko says. “But I can tell whether they’ll be able to learn it from the first time they pick up a needle. They have to have good fingers, with sensitivity of feel but strong. The dexterity- it’s like a surgeon’s with that kind of focus, that ability to concentrate on very tiny things while working on a very big thing.” And, he adds, a good sense of color is extremely important. The lighting in the working end of his shop is necessarily strong, and color matches are best done in the daylight.

This kind of work is expensive. Often Hayko has to explain to potential customers that the cost of repairing their rug is greater than the value of the carpet itself.

“From a picture I can tell them if it’s worthwhile,” he says. He bemoans a business in which customers are often told that their purchase is rare and precious when, in fact, the carpet they are buying is very ordinary indeed.

Has damage ever gone too far for repair? Like so many things in the world of rugs, the answer is both yes and no. If the pattern is recognizable, even a tiny scrap can be expanded into a larger carpet.

“But you get to a point where you have to ask whether it’s worth the bother (or the expense)”.

Trade Talk

Trade Talk     11/12/2009

by Andrew Pageby,
as seen in Avenue

After buying an ornate but well-worn seventeenth-century Ouchak carpet for close to $100,000, a Christie’s customer asked Elisabeth Poole, head of the auction house’s carpet department, to recommend someone who might be able to restore the antique Turkish rug. Poole suggested transporting it just a few blocks away to Hayko Oltaci, an Armenian born in Istanbul, whose shop is only one flight up but a world apart from the hustle and bustle of Lexington Avenue in the Sixties.

After buying an ornate but well-worn seventeenth-century Ouchak carpet for close to $100,000, a Christie’s customer asked Elisabeth Poole, head of the auction house’s carpet department, to recommend someone who might be able to restore the antique Turkish rug. Poole suggested transporting it just a few blocks away to Hayko Oltaci, an Armenian born in Istanbul, whose shop is only one flight up but a world apart from the hustle and bustle of Lexington Avenue in the Sixties.

After buying an ornate but well-worn seventeenth-century Ouchak carpet for close to $100,000, a Christie’s customer asked Elisabeth Poole, head of the auction house’s carpet department, to recommend someone who might be able to restore the antique Turkish rug. Poole suggested transporting it just a few blocks away to Hayko Oltaci, an Armenian born in Istanbul, whose shop is only one flight up but a world apart from the hustle and bustle of Lexington Avenue in the Sixties.

Poole will sometimes consult Oltaci when assessing the value of a damaged carpet, and she praised the accuracy of his estimates on restoration. But it is the quality of his work that puts him among the handful of restorers to whom poole will entrust antique textiles. “He is very good at matching colors and the type of wool,” she says. “And he takes his time, which is most important for matching colors exactly.”

Oltaci, a thoughtful 39-nine-year-old with a bushy moustache, conducts much of his business from behind a wooden desk, above which hangs a canopy made from an asmalik, a tasseled Turkish tent decoration. A prayer rug from the Mudjur region of Turkey is displayed on the wall beside the fax machine, and dozens of carpets, rolled up into richly colored bundles, stand against the exposed brick wall that runs the length of the long, narrow shop.

Though his desk faces the new carpets, which he sells, Oltaci’s main focus is the work on old and antique carpets that takes place in the brightly light room behind him and makes up 80 percent of his business. Behind a set of glass doors, three women are seated, each with a massive carpet folded before her on a long table. As they work, they carry on conversations in Armenian, speaking loudly enough to be heard across the distances that the massive carpets put between them.

A woman wearing a bright printed blouse ties new knots in an eighty-year-old Turkish carpet, a painstaking job that will take two months to complete. Unlike a Persian rug, Turkish carpets are double knotted, and the repair must match the original weaver’s technique or there will be a contrast between new and old work. On the wall behind her, there is a cascade of yarns in the range of colors that can be seen in the large rug folded on the table.

Across from her, another woman is repairing a ninety-year-old Persian carpet in which the design has been worn flat after years of use. Because all the knots are intact, the addition of new wool, once it has been carefully trimmed and blended for color will make the carpet plush once again, though the laborious work of matching colors and design will take nearly a year to complete.

Asked what is the most important attribute for a carpet restorer, Oltaci answers concisely an accent that has dimmed only slightly in his ten years in New York: “Patience.” He personally trains his employees in the techniques he learned as a teenager in Istanbul, where he first studied at a famous carpet repair shop. Oltaci was not born into the carpet business, but discovered a passion and a talent for their repair after his father sent out a carpet and it returned with shoddy workmanship. “They didn’t ruin it, but they did cheap work,” says Oltaci. “I thought it shouldn’t be like this, so, after, I learned how to repair rugs.” While studying, Oltaci became fascinated with carpet designs, especially those of Caucasian and Turkish prayer rugs. He discovered he had a talent for being able to replicate motifs that had been worn down or, in some cases, that had disappeared in places. He also discovered an ability to exactly match original weaving techniques, which vary greatly depending on the region and era in which a carpet was made.

After two years of study in Istanbul, Oltaci moved to Strasbourg, France, where he went to study economics but ended up repairing carpets at his cousin’s business; first for extra money, and then as his full-time job. He then made his way to New York in 1988, where he worked for several years for Bergi Adonian, a carpet dealer who handles important, museum-quality carpets. Six years ago, he went into business for himself, first in Chelsea, and then, two years ago, on the Upper East Side.

For Oltaci, repair work must look as good from the front as the back, even though only one side is visible. “That is the only way the carpet will be perfect,” he says. That unrelenting focus on quality has endeared him to Benjamin Aryeh, the president of Rafael Gallery, who has been a faithful client since 1992, when Oltaci worked for Andonian.

He is able to match the weave in the carpet and to replace whatever is missing with the exact color, says Aryeh. “You don’t see the restoration when he is done.” Recently, Aryeh purchased a Bessarabian carpet that had been unsuccessfully restored, so he brought it to Oltaci, who redid the work with perfect results. On another occasion, Oltaci insisted on redoing repair because it did not meet his own standards, ever though Aryeh was satisfied with it. “Above all, he is an amiable and pleasant fellow,” says Aryeh. With two decades of experience, Oltaci takes on the restoration of any handmade textiles, and works on modern and antique carpets of Oriental or European origins. For antique restorations, he keeps a collection of antique vegetable-dyed wools for exact matching, but will typically use modern chemical-dyed wools. In addition to the Oriental carpets, his shop is currently at work on a nineteenth-century Aubusson, the French equivalent of a kilim.

For this business, Oltaci says one must have the focus and dexterity of a surgeon as well as an instinctual feel for the original weaver’s intent. When he is training his employees, he tries to get them beyond the simple technique.

“Everybody uses the same knot but there can be different ways of seeing it,” he says. “I teach them how to really see the knot, and then how to do it perfectly.”

Hayko Oltaci can be reached at Hayko Restoration and Conservation Antique Rugs and Tapestry, 857 Lexington Avenue, second floor; New York, NY 10021; 212-717-5400.